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Meet Rajendra Singh – The Waterman of India

Rajendra Singh the Waterman of IndiaA tip of the hat goes to Tushar Gandhi for introducing us to this amazing innovator …

Rajendra Singh is a man on a mission – he wants to stop a Third World War from breaking out because of water shortage. Singh, known as the “waterman of India”, is a celebrated water reclaimationist from the Alwar district of Rajasthan India. Singh won the Stockholm Water Prize, an award known as “the Nobel Prize for water”, in 2015. The prize honors individuals, organizations and institutions whose work contributes to the conservation and protection of water resources, and to the well-being of the planet and its inhabitants.

Previously, Singh won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for community leadership in 2001 for his pioneering work in community-based efforts in water harvesting and water management.  He runs an NGO called ‘Tarun Bharat Sangh‘, based in village Kishori-Bhikampura in Thanagazi tehsil, near the Sariska Tiger Reserve, and has helped villagers take charge of water management in their semi-arid area through the use of johad rainwater storage tanks, check dams and other time-tested as well as path-breaking techniques. Starting from a single village in 1985, over the years TBS helped build over 8,600 johads and other water conservation structures to collect rainwater for the dry seasons, has brought water back to over 1,000 villages and revived five rivers in Rajasthan, Arvari, Ruparel, Sarsa, Bhagani and Jahajwali.

The Grand Ancient Science of Aquifers

Singh learned to know the sense of flow and the science of aquifers before adopting water conservation methods, “Know the earth, its curves, and soil and water flow before setting out to conserve water,” Singh says. “The balance between the subsurface, the underground, and deep underground should be maintained.”

“The johad is key to revitalizing the natural remaining aquifers of an otherwise arid area,” says Singh. 

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Anuradha Bhosale on Castes, Religion and Her Sacred Mission

Anuradha Bhosale Interview by Lynnea BylundAnuradha Bhosale is a highly cherished hero to thousands of impoverished children and their families. Ms Bhosale is a renowned grassroots women’s rights and anti-child labor activist based in Kolhapur, India where more than 35,000 children are involved in daily labor for local industries. A former child-laborer herself at the age of six, she has spent the past 20 years fighting for the prevention of child exploitation, labor, trafficking, and female infanticide.

[note: This interview was first published at www.gandhiforchildren.org]

Owning to her heroism and accomplishments Anuradha has been called the ‘Bandit Queen of India’s Social Movement’, likened to India’s legendary ‘Bandit Queen’, Phoolan Devi who went from ordinary village woman to seasoned bandit of northern India and finally an elected member of Indian Parliament before being gunned down by unknown assassins.

As founder of the WCRC (Women and Child Rights Campaign), Anuradha has educated, trained and empowered thousands of widowed, divorced and deprived women in the rural areas of India to stand up and fight for their rights as allowed by the Indian constitution. 52,000 of them now receive some $714,000 in monthly government pension checks ro which they were previously unaware of being entitled.

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India Proclaims the Emancipation of its Cetaceans

dolphins and other cetaceans are emancipated in India

Dolphin jumping for joy upon hearing news of India’s Cetacean Emancipation

Cetaceans Granted Unprecedented ‘Non-Human Persons’ Rights in India

The nation of India has become the first country to officially recognize dolphins and whales as “non-human persons,” whose rights to life and liberty “must be respected.”  Dolphin sea parks that were being built across the country will instead be shut down.

India’s Ministry of Environment and Forests has advised state governments to ban ‘dolphinariums’ and other commercial entertainment that involves the capture and confinement of cetacean species such as orcas and bottlenose dolphins. In a statement, the government said research had clearly established cetaceans are highly intelligent and sensitive, and that dolphins “should be seen as ‘non-human persons’ and as such should have their own specific rights.”

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Gandhi’s Life in Color

review mahatma gandhi's life in colorRecently, and just in time for the holidays, I was gifted MAHATMA, Gandhi’s Life in Colour: a wonderful new Gandhi bio-pictorial book.  The publisher, GandhiServe Foundation, operates the world’s largest repository of digitized Gandhi historical media. This is a fabulous ground-breaking photo book, impressive in its size and volume of images; many of which previously unseen by me.

This grand assemblage includes a short forward by Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak, the eminent sociologist and social reformer who increasingly is becoming known in India and abroad as the “Toilet Guru” for his efforts to bring modern toilet facilities to 300 million Indians who are still forced to defecate in the open, and to utilize such facilities to generate renewable-energy bio-gas.

Gandhi’s Life in Color

frontier gandhi redshirt armyMAHATMA, Gandhi’s Life in Colour, reintroduces to the world the iconic figure of Gandhi through preciously rare images and archival material. An interdisciplinary labor of love, Gandhi historians and scholars, photographic authorities and digital designers collaborated to transform black and white photographs into color images and authentic historical documents.

Painstakingly assembled and published by GandhiServe India, this uniquely imposing pictorially beautiful biography presents nearly 1,300 photographs spanning the entirity of Gandhi’s life in color, from 1869 thru his death in 1948, traversing 690 pages and weighing in at over 14 pounds, MAHATMA is the ultimate coffee table book for any student, lover, or adherent of Gandhian history and philosophy.

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